1. Mysterious epidemic devastates starfish population off the Pacific Coast (by PBS NewsHour)

     
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  3. Includes seastar wasting disease

     
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  5. Accepting Applications! Summer Course at Friday Harbor

    Ecology of Infectious Marine Diseases
    (Biol 533 D, 9 credits)

    More details and how to apply


    Session B: July 21 - August 22, 2014 (5 weeks)
    Monday-Saturday (Mon-Fri 8:30 am-5 pm, plus Sat morning 8:30 am-noon

    Infectious diseases of marine organisms are on the increase, and yet processes governing host infectivity and pathogen virulence are  poorly known, especially for non-commercial marine invertebrates. Indeed, one of the emerging frontiers in ocean research is invertebrate-microbial interactions.  This course is a training program in invertebrate-pathogen ecology that will bring together and train the future leaders in this rapidly emerging, multidisciplinary field. The course will 1) survey host-pathogen interaction in the Friday Harbor region, 2) teach diagnostic tools for identifying viral, bacterial, protozoan and fungal infections of invertebrates, 3) teach approaches to examine the invertebrate innate immune response to different pathogens, and finally 4) use these methods to address ecological questions about the distribution of pathogenic interactions, and the experimental effects of temperature and increased acidification on interactions.

     
  6. 11:17 3rd Dec 2012

    Notes: 2

    New computer tools!

    Hi everyone! I just took a software carpentry workshop and I learned about some great tools that are especially useful for collaborating and I wanted to share them with you. 

    Similar to our online lab notebooks, there is a online notebook called iPython. You can share this notebook publicly and restrict who can edit it (very similar to google docs). iPy was specifically designed to write code and conduct data analysis, but it is also useful for writing articles/blog posts, sharing videos etc. Most importantly, iPy is designed to work on all operating systems and can understand code for numerous other programs (such as R). I think this is a really great option for collaborative research, for example, I could see this could have been a really powerful tool for the Laby project (especially after the class ended)!

    The other program that I’m really excited about sharing is Git. This is a free, online program for version control. If you don’t know what that is, it is basically a way to back up your project over time so that you can access previous versions at a later date. Version control takes “fingerprints” or “snapshots” of whatever folders/documents/directories you tell it to as often as you want. This program is a little more intimidating to use, as you have to access it through your shell (Terminal if you think back to our bioinformatics session) so the interface could be a bit more user friendly, but it is definitely worth trying out!

    -Jamie

     
  7. Thank you all for everything!

    Ana

     
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  11. 06:52 10th Sep 2012

    Notes: 141

    Reblogged from mothernaturenetwork

    image: Download

    mothernaturenetwork:

Are animal-borne diseases on the rise?Deforestation, climate change and movement of people may be contributing to the rise of the hantavirus, Wile Nile and even the plague.

    mothernaturenetwork:

    Are animal-borne diseases on the rise?
    Deforestation, climate change and movement of people may be contributing to the rise of the hantavirus, Wile Nile and even the plague.

     
  12. 22:32 9th Sep 2012

    Notes: 11

    Reblogged from lisa418

    laboratoryequipment:

    A new study finds that bacteria on marine sponges can develop capacity to move and inhibit biofilm formation. When enough bacteria get together in one place, they can make a collective decision to grow an appendage and swim away. This type of behavior has been seen for the first time in marine…

     
  13. 22:32

    Notes: 66

    Reblogged from lisa418

    image: Download

    laboratoryequipment:

Canada’s Abandonment of Environmental Project Worries ScientistsThe Canadian government’s plans to discontinue in 2013 a unique environmental research project that has yielded insights into water pollution, climate change and other topics for almost 40 years would be a “huge loss not only to science but to the scientific heritage of humanity.”Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/canadas-abandonment-environmental-project-worries-scientists

    laboratoryequipment:

    Canada’s Abandonment of Environmental Project Worries Scientists

    The Canadian government’s plans to discontinue in 2013 a unique environmental research project that has yielded insights into water pollution, climate change and other topics for almost 40 years would be a “huge loss not only to science but to the scientific heritage of humanity.”

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/09/canadas-abandonment-environmental-project-worries-scientists

     
  14. 07:38 3rd Sep 2012

    Notes: 118

    Reblogged from laboratoryequipment

    laboratoryequipment:

Viruses Could be the Key to Healthy CoralCorals are an invaluable part of the marine ecosystem, fostering biodiversity and protecting coastlines. But they’re also increasingly endangered. Pathogenic bacteria, along with pollution and harmful fishing practices, are one of the biggest threats to the world’s coral populations today.One of the solutions to the crisis may lie in human medicine. Prof. Eugene Rosenberg of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, working in collaboration with Ilil Atad of his own laboratory and Yossi Loya of TAU’s Department of Zoology, has developed a treatment for coral infected by Thalassomonas loyana, otherwise known as White Plague disease. This deadly bacterium infects 9 percent of Favia favus corals on the Eilat coral reef in the Red Sea and readily transmits the disease to nearby healthy corals.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/08/viruses-could-be-key-healthy-coral

    laboratoryequipment:

    Viruses Could be the Key to Healthy Coral

    Corals are an invaluable part of the marine ecosystem, fostering biodiversity and protecting coastlines. But they’re also increasingly endangered. Pathogenic bacteria, along with pollution and harmful fishing practices, are one of the biggest threats to the world’s coral populations today.

    One of the solutions to the crisis may lie in human medicine. Prof. Eugene Rosenberg of Tel Aviv Univ.’s Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, working in collaboration with Ilil Atad of his own laboratory and Yossi Loya of TAU’s Department of Zoology, has developed a treatment for coral infected by Thalassomonas loyana, otherwise known as White Plague disease. This deadly bacterium infects 9 percent of Favia favus corals on the Eilat coral reef in the Red Sea and readily transmits the disease to nearby healthy corals.

    Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2012/08/viruses-could-be-key-healthy-coral

     
  15. From FHL to Indonesia..yes this summer totally rocks!

    Reflections on the last 5 weeks! It was an incredible 5 weeks at Friday Harbor Labs for the Ecology of Infectious Marine Disease course. After 6 years heavily immersed in the field of coral disease ecology, it was refreshing and invigorating to take a step back and remind myself how my research fits into the larger field of marine disease epidemiology/ecology. There are so many incredible diagnostic tools and during the course we learned how to take a stepwise approach to diagnosing a disease and navigating the inevitable challenges that accompany studying disease in the marine environment. As a field ecologist, I also appreciated our instructors’ patience as we discussed and used several molecular techniques. As a graduate student, I think the aspect that I enjoyed most was the collaboration I developed with our instructors and students.

    The Adventure Continues! After a few days of R&R in Seattle, I hopped on a plane for Indonesia to meet up with Dr. Erinn Muller (post-doc at Mote Marine Laboratory, Fl) and several collaborators from Hasanudin University. Over the course of the next 3 weeks, we will be conducting coral disease and fish surveys inside and outside marine protected areas (MPAs) at 3 locations to test the effectiveness of MPAs in promoting coral health. Indonesian coral reefs lie within the Coral Triangle, the center of coral reef global biodiversity. Comprised of over 17.000 islands, Indonesia contains the second largest reef habitat in the world and is a mecca for any coral reef biologist. During the last decade, Coral Reef Rehabilitation and Management Program (COREMAP) aims to promote the recovery of fish populations from over-fishing, as well as increase coral health and resilience. In 2011, a team from Cornell University, Mote Marine Laboratory, James Cook University, University of Guam, The Nature Conservancy and Hasanudin University visited Indonesia to help initiate a coral health and disease working group. This group also conducted a series of baseline coral disease surveys and found that regions such as the Spermonde Archipelago have relatively low levels of coral disease. However, there are significant coral diseases present, all of which have been described from other reefs in the Indo-Pacific region, making this a critical time for completing baseline surveys. I arrived into Denpasar (Bali) on the 28th after ~30 hours of traveling with 4 different airline carriers…and believe it or not both my bags made it! After a quick overnight stay, I set off for Maumere to meet up with our collaborators. Maumere is a port town on the island of Flores, which is situated in the south-central region of Indonesia and is directly in the “Ring of Fire.” Flores is well known of its 5 active volcanoes and spectacular reefs! We arrived to the Wailiti Beach hotel, which is a beautiful quaint hotel on the beach. During the first day, we spent a lot of time discussing experimental design and general logistics and luckily Erinn finally arrived after a torrent of horrible travel issues (I thought I had bad travel karma). We just got back from our first day in the water and I am afraid I will have to keep you all in suspense a little bit longer because today deserves its own blog entry. Suffice it to say today was one of the highlights of my scientific career! Stay tuned! ~Courtney